Amazing Creatures of the Amazon Rainforest

1.4 Billion Untamed Acres

Sponsored by Crystal Cruises

The Amazon Rainforest is one of the world’s most incredible natural wonders. It covers approximately 1.4 billion acres and is located mostly in Brazil, although parts can also be found in Peru, Venezuela, Ecuador, Columbia, Guyana and Bolivia.

An astounding number of animal and insect species can be found in the Amazon, and it is believed that there are still many undiscovered creatures hidden in this dense rainforest.

With so much ground to cover, we love the option of combing a land and Crystal River Cruise tour! Here’s what you can expect to see on your adventure cruise.

Creatures of the Amazon

The Amazon is alive with creatures, both big and small, cute and intimidating.

If you do decide to embark on a tour of the Amazon, you’ll spy some of the many monkey species that call the rainforest home: squirrel monkeys, brown capuchin monkeys, dusky titi monkeys and howler monkeys (which you’ll hear before you see!).

Of course, there are many other mammals you might spot during a walk or boat trip through the Amazon.

There are still many undiscovered creatures hidden in this dense rainforest.

Capybara
The largest rodent in the world. These creatures resemble mutant guinea pigs and can often be found in large groups. You might also see another large rodent known as the agouti scamper by or giant otters playing on the banks of the river.

Boto
The Amazon is home to one of the few freshwater dolphin species in the world—and it’s pink! This breathtaking creature is also known as the boto. Sadly, like the Amazon, these creatures are in danger of disappearing from the earth. Though they’re still frequently seen on Amazon tours, they are considered an endangered species.

Jaguar
If you’re extremely lucky and very quiet, you may even spy the rare and elusive jaguar. The best way to see one is by boat, possibly surprising one quenching its thirst along the banks of the Amazon as you slip quietly by on the river.

Feathered Friends

More than 1,300 different bird species live in the Amazon Basin, including some of the most colorful and beautiful in the world such as macaws as well as many different species of parrots and parakeets.

One of the best ways to spot these lovely, large birds is to have a guide take you to a clay lick. At the more popular licks, you might see hundreds of brightly colored birds, including the stunning scarlet macaws and blue-and-yellow macaws.

A claylick is a naturally formed wall of clay on a riverbank caused by erosion from the river and while no one knows for sure, scientist theorize the birds like it for sodium and detoxification.

Amphibians, Reptiles and Fish

Not surprisingly, the Amazon rainforest is home to a large number of reptiles, amphibians and fish.

Turtles
It’s not unusual to encounter one of the 45 species of turtles sunning themselves along the river banks. On exceptional days you might see the Giant South American turtle feasting on fallen fruit to help maintain that weight of over 200 pounds.

Snakes
You may even see an anaconda, one of the largest snakes in the world. This monstrous snake can, in fact, grow up to 20 intimidating feet. Of course, it is just one of many species of snakes that call the Amazon rainforest home. Other snakes you might see during a trek through the rainforest including coral snakes and emerald tree boas.

Frogs
Are snakes not your thing? Then how about looking for colorful poison dart frogs. These tiny creatures come in a variety of eye-catching hues, including vivid yellows, reds and blues as well as neon oranges and greens. But, remember, their stunning coloring is a warning that you should look but never touch them. The best time to see these frogs is at after dark, so if you can, consider taking a night walk with an experienced guide.

Don’t worry about missing a thing, your talented and experienced guides will be sure to point them out, so keep the binoculars and cameras handy.

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